HOME
TERMS
ABOUT US
LOGIN
CONTACT US
HOURS & DIRECTIONS
ADVANCED SEARCH
BROWSE

0 Items

***

THE OBSERVER. Saturday Morning December 6, 1823. Volume I. Number 49. Salem, Mass. 1823.

20 x 13.5, 4 pp. Browning, spotting, staining, tears, creasing, removal marks. President Monroe addressed Congress on December 2, 1823, this speech became known as "The Monroe Doctrine." The Observer excerpted the President's message to Congress from the December 2nd issue of the National Intelligencer Extra, allowing the citizens of Salem to read the speech only four days after it had been given. The idea for the policy of not interfering with the politics of Europe and for Europe to be prevented from taking a controlling share in U.S. politics originated with George Washington but was announced officially by Monroe. Also in the speech: "In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives . . . instructions have been given to all the Ministers of the United States accredited to the powers of Europe and America, to propose the proscription of the African slave trade . . ." and "The usual orders have been given to all our public ships, to seize American vessels engaged in the Slave trade . . . " Unrelated, there is a brief mention in New Orleans . . . of a projected insurrection among the slaves . . . petition to be sent to Washington for a body of 200 men . . . "


Book Id: 97-5764

Price: $195.00

privacy policy | security | Site Map | Site by Bibliopolis